Re: Skipping the College Tour

Skipping the College Tour
Skipping the College Tour, The New York Times

You may or may not have read The New York Times’ recent article, “Skipping the College Tour”. As they explain, visiting colleges before applying or committing has become an important step of the application process. However, the article argues that visiting a campus doesn’t help us make a better college decision because it’s difficult to make a current decision for our future selves. Their reasoning is that it’s challenging to make a decision based on imagination, not experience.

This article asks, “So why isn’t there an epidemic of students who find themselves in the wrong place and either transfer or drop out? Maybe there is.” In my path to graduation, this happened the two times I visited a college’s campus.

Inside Higher Ed states, “New data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center show that 37.2 percent of college students transfer at least once within six years.” That’s over a third of students!

I want to publicly share how visiting college campuses has affected my college experiences:

  1. I visited and applied to one college during high school. I enrolled, but quickly left.
  2. I didn’t visit the second college I applied to. Again, this was the only school I applied to. However, this time I was happy and stayed until I graduated with my associate’s. (Since it was a two-year college, I had to transfer for my bachelor’s.)
  3. I visited and researched numerous colleges to transfer to, and I thought I found a perfect fit. Yet, I left after one semester.
  4. Technically, I visited my current college, but since I’m in the online program (and didn’t attend an online open house), I don’t consider this as having actually visited. I plan to graduate from this program with my bachelor’s next spring.

In summary:

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Based on my experiences, this New York Times’ article rings true because visiting campus appears to “hinder [my] ability to pick a college”. Every time.

It should be noted that even though I didn’t visit the schools I was most happy at, I did research them and knew they offered the program I wanted. I didn’t, however, conduct as thorough research of the schools I enjoyed as I did for the schools I didn’t stay at.

– Sarah C.

3 Lessons to Learn about Friendships in College

Re: 10 awkward friendships you probably have

A couple months ago, I read an article about friendships here that really resonated with me. Skeptically, I shared it around to see whether others felt the same, and discovered that a lot of the ideas hold true. Here are some important lessons to remember about friendships in college, related to the article:

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Transfer Credits: Manor College to Moravian College

After graduating from Manor College I immediately transferred to Moravian College. Moravian did a great job recruiting me as a transfer student, and quickly sent me my credit evaluation.

Luckily all of my courses transferred, but over half of my classes transferred as electives. Therefore, take note that even if your admissions counselor says, “All of your courses will transfer,” your credit transferring problems are probably not over! Make sure you know how to petition for credit. As a transfer student, electives don’t help much when transferring; it’s practically guaranteed that you’ll have more electives than you know what to do with after transferring.

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Comparing College Career Paths

Despite my younger sister being two years behind me in high school, we’ll be graduating from college at the same time. Have I spent an extra two years pursuing my Bachelor’s? Luckily, not quite.

Before enrolling at college, I took a year-long gap year off from school. My sister, on the other hand, immediately started college when she graduated from high school.

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3 Things To Do While Waiting for a Decision

Although it’s been almost two years since I’ve transferred, I remember the feeling of waiting for a transfer admission decision. Since you’ve sent in your essays and information, all you can do is wait. It’s difficult, especially because you just want to hear back. Here are three things you can do while waiting for a decision:

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I Regret Transferring to Temple University

Warning: This post is not meant to bash Temple University in any way. If I’m being completely honest, it simply isn’t the best fit for me personally.

You’re probably thinking “Woah, that’s a hefty title!” Well, transferring from a small two-year college to a ridiculously large university with 38,000 times the students was quite a hefty change!

“Then why make such a hefty change?” you may ask. One word: finances.

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Multitasking as a Non-Traditional Student

Copy of MULTITASKING AS A NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENT

When I returned to college in 2013 to obtain my Paralegal Certificate at Manor College, I was a full-time mom and student, part-time fitness instructor, and intern as a Paralegal. In addition, I dog sat and worked part-time in a floral shop.

Where did I find the time? Multitasking and time management. A calendar on my phone was a must (including a paper backup – one time I deleted my phone calendar and needless to say, it was crazy until I could recover it). Ever since then, I use a backup program for my phone called Samsung Kies.

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6 Reasons to Make Sleep a Priority

If you’re like most college students, you’re probably sleep-deprived. According to the University Health Center at the University of Georgia, “most college students get 6 – 6.9 hours of sleep per night” but “most adults need somewhere between 6-10 hours of sleep per night.”

It’s okay not to participate in every activity; doing so will give you more time to focus on your other responsibilities, and ideally give you time for some extra sleep. If you’re stretched too thin, you won’t be able to perform at your best for any of your tasks.

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